Happy Veterans Day from Agate Dreams

On November 11, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson declared Armistice Day to be a day of “solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service.” Speaking on the one year anniversary of the end of hostilities in World War I (“The Great War as it was known at the time) the idea of Wilson and others was that parades and demonstrations would take place on the day as well as a “break in business” to honor those who served. On June 4, 1926, Congress first recognized it as a national holiday and it was first observed that year.

In 1954, veterans groups pushed to expand Armistice Day to honor veterans of World War II as well. World War II saw an extraordinary mobilization of troops and resources as the United States fought to save Democracy around the world. With a swipe of a pen, President Dwight D. Eisenhower[1] turned Armistice Day into Veterans Day. Since then, the day has been one where we recognize the efforts of those who served to protect the United States.

We here at Agate Dreams are very thankful for our freedoms. We understand that our freedom has come at a great cost through the years, and it has been our brave military that has had to pay that cost. November 11th means more than a day off of work or school. It’s a day where we should recognize those men and women who serve, or who have served, in our nation’s Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, we humbly thank you for your service.

If you are not a veteran, we have a challenge to issue you. Take the time to thank the veterans you know for their service. A phone call, a text, even a Facebook post can show gratitude. If you are able, take it a step further. Take a veteran out to lunch. Visit someone from an older generation and listen to what they have to say. Talk with a veteran who may need someone to talk to. Volunteer your time with an organization that serves veterans. Perhaps a gift from Agate Dreams may be appreciated?

Whatever you can do, we owe our heroes some appreciation. We should reflect on what they have given us, on what they will continue to guarantee for future generations. We should say thank you. Again, veterans, thank you for your service.

Toke on, remember, and honor, Dreamers.

[1] Also one of the greatest generals the world has ever known! He was also a running back and linebacker at West Point where he injured his knee playing against Jim Thorpe. How’s that for a random fact?